Towards a unified court and a unitary effect for European patents in almost all the member states of the European Union. Consequences of Spain’s auto-exclussion

Author:
Manuel Desantes Real.

Abstract:
Following more than fifty-five years of negotiations, the erroneously called «unitary patent package» has seen the light at the end of 2012 and the beginning of 2013. Representing a major breakthrough in a key area for the development of the internal market, the results however have been disappointing. The lack of unanimous agreement on the language regime has led to an enhanced cooperation procedure, the annulment of which has been pressed for by Spain and Italy before the Court of Justice: the outcome is that instead of creating a unitary patent as an autonomous EU title, the proposal has been made to attribute unitary effect to European patents in the States participating in enhanced cooperation if the holder of the patent so wishes, effects not governed by EU law but rather by the law of one of the participating States. The willingness of member states to exclude the Court of Justice has led to an international agreement to create a Unified Patent Court which is both an international tribunal and a court pertaining to the jurisdiction of each member state. Neither Spain nor Poland has signed the agreement.

Index:
1. INTRODUCCIÓN. EL LARGO CAMINO DESDE 1959 HASTA 2013.—2. LA PATENTE EUROPEA CON EFECTO UNITARIO. CONSECUENCIAS PRÁCTICAS DE LA APLICACIÓN DE LOS REGLAMENTOS 1257/2012 Y 1260/2012.—3. EL ACUERDO SOBRE EL TRIBUNAL UNIFICADO DE PATENTES DE 19 DE FEBRERO DE 2013.—4. REPERCUSIÓN DEL «PAQUETE DE PATENTES» EN ESPAÑA Y EN LAS EMPRESAS ESPAÑOLAS

Keywords:
enhanced cooperation; European patents; European patents with unitary effect; language arrangements; Uniform Patent Court; Unitary patents;

Issue:
REDI Vol. LXV 2 2013

Section:
Studies

Pages:
51-70

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